Seminars

fall semester 2018

 

Location:
318 Butler-Carlton Hall
Rolla, MO 65409
*changes noted below
Time:
3:30 - 4:30 p.m.
*changes noted below


Speakers & Dates:

 

  • Paul Williams | Tuesday September 4
  • Nadege Oustriere | Wednesday October 24
  • Kimberly Parker | Wednesday November 14
  • Sanjay Tewari | Wednesday Noverber 28

 

Questions?

Have a question about one of our seminars? Contact our office and we will be happy to answer any of your questions.

View our contact info

 

Archive of seminars

2018 Seminars

Drones, aircraft and an inflatable banana, A quick review of Manchester

Paul Williams, Ph.D.
Research Fellow
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
University of Manchester
University, UK

3:30 p.m.
Tuesday September 4, 2018
318 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
The Centre for Atmospheric Science (CAS) at the University of Manchester has many research activities ranging from fundamental SOA production in its photochemical environmental chamber, to large scale ambient air quality programs in India and China. The talk will give an overview of the activities, focusing on some of the key work including recent advances in quantifying methane fluxes from landfill sites using drones, development of regulatory emissions measurements from large gas turbine engines and the work on black carbon.

Biography:
Paul I. Williams is a research fellow at the University of Manchester. He works in the School of Earth and Environmental Science, within the Centre for Atmospheric research group. His roll is funded by the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) as an Aerosol Instrument Scientist. His main activities involve maintaining the suite of particle characterisation equipment at Manchester and deploying the equipment as part of the group's research activities. He runs a short course in Practical Aerosol Science, sponsored by TSI Ltd, which teaches participants the theory and practical elements to aerosol measurement. 

 He will be bringing the banana. 

Cardiovascular effects of ambient PM2.5: The roles of particle compositions and source categories

Lung-Chi Chen, Ph.D.
Professor

Director of Inhalation Facility,
Deptartment of Environmental Medicine
New York University School of Medicine
Web:
http://www.med.nyu.edu/biosketch/lcc4

3:30 p.m.
Wednesday April 25, 2018
124 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Particulate matter, an ambient air criteria pollutant, is a complex mixture of chemical components. We conducted four studies as part of HEI’s integrated National Particle Component Toxicity (NPACT) Initiative research program. Data from the Chemical Speciation Net- work (CSN) enabled us to conduct a limited time-series epidemiologic study of short-term morbidity and mortality; and a study of the associations between long-term average pollutant concentrations and annual mortality. We also conducted a series of 6-month subchronic inhalation exposure studies (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) of PM2.5 concentrated 10X from ambient air (CAPs) with apolipoprotein E–deficient (ApoE-/-) mice (a mouse model of atherosclerosis). The CAPs studies were conducted in five different U.S. airsheds (New York City; Tuxedo, NY; East Lansing Michigan; Seattle Washington; Irvine, California); we measured the daily mass concentrations of PM2.5, black carbon (BC), and 16 elemental components in order to identify their sources and their roles in eliciting both short- and long-term health-related responses. In addition, from the same five airsheds we collected samples of coarse (PM10–2.5), fine (PM2.5–0.2), and ultrafine (PM0.2) particles. Aliquots of these samples were administered to cells in vitro and to mouse lungs in vivo (by aspiration) in order to determine their comparative acute effects.

Overall, the studies have demonstrated that the toxicity of PM is driven by a complex interaction of particle size range, geographic location, source category, and season. Across all studies, fossil-fuel combustion source categories were most consistently associated with both short- and long- term adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure. The components that originate from the Residual Oil Combustion and Traffic source categories were most closely associated with short-term effects; and components from the Coal Combustion category were more closely associated with long-term effects.

The results of these complementary studies, and the overall integrative analyses, provide a basis for guiding future research and for helping to determine more targeted emission controls for the PM components most hazardous to acute and chronic health. Application of the knowledge gained in this work may therefore contribute to an optimization of the public health benefits of future PM emission controls.

Key Interests:
Nanoparticle Toxicity and functional utilization, The role of health disparity in air pollution-induced cardiopulmonary diseases, Gene-environment interactions in environmentally induced diseases, Effects of particulate air pollution in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, Mechanisms of air pollution induced asthma, Pollutant-induced alterations in biological response modifiers and associated membrane receptors, Signal transductionpathways associated with oxidative stress. 

Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment:  A Vision to Enable Decentralized Water Treatment and Address Growing Challenges of the Water Energy Nexus

Pedro J.J. Alvarez, Ph.D.
George R. Brown Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering
Rice University
Houston, TX

2:00 p.m.
Thursday April 12, 2018
125 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Through control over material size, morphology and chemical structure, nanotechnology offers novel materials that are nearly “all surface” and that can be more reactive per atom than bulk materials. Such engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) can offer superior catalytic, adsorptive, optical, quantum, electrical and/or antimicrobial properties that enable multi-functional technology platforms for next-generation water treatment. This presentation will address emerging opportunities for nanotechnology to improve the selectivity and efficiency to remove priority pollutants, decrease electrical energy requirements, and meet a growing need for safer and more affordable decentralized water treatment and reuse. Because water is by far the largest waste stream of the energy industry, we will also discuss technological innovation to enable produced water reuse in remote (off-grid) oil and gas fields, to minimize freshwater withdrawal and disposal challenges. Examples of applicable nano-enabled technologies include fouling-resistant membranes with embedded ENMs that allow for self-cleaning and repair; capacitive deionization with highly conductive and selective electrodes to remove multivalent ions that precipitate or cause scaling; rapid magnetic separation using superparamagnetic nanoparticles; solar-thermal processes enabled by nanophotonics to desalinate with membrane distillation; disinfection and advanced oxidation using nanocatalysts; and nanostructured surfaces that discourage microbial adhesion and protect infrastructure against biofouling and corrosion. We envision using these enabling technologies to develop compact modular water treatment systems that are easy to deploy and can treat challenging waters to protect human lives and support sustainable economic development.

Biography:
Pedro J.J. Alvarez is the George R. Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University, where he also serves as Director of the NSF ERC on Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT). His research interests include environmental implications and applications of nanotechnology, bioremediation, fate and transport of toxic chemicals, water footprint of biofuels, water treatment and reuse, and antibiotic resistance control. Pedro received the B. Eng. Degree in Civil Engineering from McGill University and MS and Ph.D. degrees in Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan. He is the 2012 Clarke Prize laureate and also won the 2014 AAEES Grand Prize for Excellence in Environmental Engineering and Science. Past honors include President of AEESP, the AEESP Frontiers in Research Award, the WEF McKee Medal for Groundwater Protection, the SERDP cleanup project of the year award, and various best paper awards with his students. Pedro currently serves on the advisory board of NSF Engineering Directorate and as Associate Editor of Environmental Science and Technology. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2018.

Water for Food, Water for Life: Strategies for Improving Ecosystem Services Under Environmental Change

Noel Aloysius, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Bioengineering and School of Natural Resources
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO

3:30 p.m.
Wednesday March 21, 2018
124 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Population growth and increasing demand for food and services necessitate an increasingly productive agricultural sector, and the expansion of human interference into natural areas. Increasingly, these managed areas pose risks to public health, impair water quality and other valued ecosystem services. Overexploitation of water resources for food production limit availability and accessibility of water for other valued ecosystem services. In this presentation, I present contrasting case studies that elucidate the challenges ahead in sustainably managing our water resources. Big changes in policy agenda are required in order to ensure food and water security for the present and future generations.

Biography:
Noel Aloysius is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Bioengineering and the School of Natural Resources at the University of Missouri. He completed his PhD at Yale University, masters at the University of North Dakota and bachelors degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. His research seeks to uncover how key drivers and mechanisms, both natural and anthropogenic, affect water and nutrient flow pathways and predict their behavior under environmental change. Prior to joining MU, he was a postdoctoral researcher scholar at The Ohio State University.

Multifunctional Nanoscale Platform Materials for Advanced Environmental Applications

John D. Fortner, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering
Washington University
St. Louis, MO

3:30 p.m.
Friday February 16, 2018
124 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
This presentation will focus on the design, synthesis, and demonstration of tunable, nanoscale, material platforms for advanced environmental applications.  First, I will present of our recent work on aggregation resistant, ‘crumpled’ graphene-based nanocomposites, which allow for a unique membrane approach (and properties) when assembled as thin films. The as-synthesized, core-shell nanostructured composites, with controllable size and functionality (including magnetic susceptibility and TiO2 loading), show significantly enhanced aqueous stability and tunable photocatalytic activity due composite geometry, surface/graphene chemistry, and increased lifetime of photo-induced holes.  In addition, crumpled graphene-TiO2 nanocomposite films, deposited/stabilized atop a support membrane (polyethersulfone (PES)), readily reject and (photo)degrade model aqueous pollutants.  Further, facile photocatalytic (photoreduction-based) in situ synthesis (and subsequent regeneration) of silver nanoparticles, which are antimicrobial, is demonstrated at the membrane surface under operating conditions.  For the second part of the presentation, I will discuss our progress towards the development and application of monodisperse, magnetic metal oxide nanocrystals (e.g. iron oxide (Fe3O4), manganese oxide (MnxOy), and manganese ferrite nanocrystals (MnzFe3-zO4)) of varying size, shape, composition, and surface chemistries for optimized metal/metalloid adsorption, separation and quantification, among other applications.  Specifically, I will highlight results from a matrix evaluation of serially synthesized 8-30 nm metal oxides with tailored organic surface coatings designed to target uranium (as uranyl) in varied water chemistries.  Optimized materials demonstrate  some of the highest uranyl sorption capacities of any sorbent to date.  Mechanistically, we show that sorption enhancement is due not only to thermodynamically favorable interfacial interactions (for both particle and selected bilayer coatings), but also due to significant uranyl reduction at the particle interface itself.  Further, due to high particle monodispersivity and aqueous stabilities, residues geometries can be arranged as close-packed, sub-micron thin film geometries, which minimize self-shielding and thus allow for optimal α-particle detection strategies needed for low-level uranyl sensing.

Biography:
As an associate professor within the Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering (EECE) at Washington University in St. Louis (WUStL), Professor Fortner has developed a highly successful research program focused on developing and advancing water-related technologies and understanding/engineering interfacial processes, typically at the nanoscale, as they relate to environmental-based health, security, and energy challenges.

Characterizing pore structure and flow properties in subsurface

Chi Zhang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Geology
University of Kansas

3:30 p.m.
Wednesday January 24, 2018
124 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
The complex behavior and coupled dynamics of water and energy systems require highly integrated and innovative research strategy (sensing technology, data analysis, and adaptable model) to enhance the understanding of the tightly coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the behavior of geologic media and their constituent fluids (water, brine, CO2, and hydrocarbons) from the micro- to macro-scale. My research jointly utilizes hydrogeological, geophysical, and biogeochemical information, coupling with theoretical and numerical simulations to accurately describe the subsurface and to monitor physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring within it. In this talk, I will provide an overview of my research on characterizing pore attributes and fluid flow properties in the subsurface and the relevant applications to water, energy, and environment. I will describe how to estimate porosity, pore size distribution, surface area, and permeability in complex carbonate rocks from electrical geophysical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance from pore to field scale. The laboratory measurements are coupled with µCT imaging and physics-based numerical simulations of pore attributes and geophysical responses to quantify petrophysical properties during various geological processes including physical and biogeochemical alternations. The ultimate goal of my research is to facilitate the application of geophysical techniques in critical hydrogeological and energy investigations across multiple scales. For more information, please visit http://www.chizhanggeophysics.com/research.html.

Biography:
Dr. Chi Zhang joins the University of Kansas (KU) as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology in 2015. Prior to coming to KU, she was a postdoctoral scholar at Idaho National Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines, and Rutgers University during 2011 – 2014. Dr. Zhang received her B.S. in Environmental Science from Sun Yat-Sen University in China and her Ph.D. in Environmental Geophysics from Rutgers University. Dr. Zhang’s research interests focus on the development of geophysical monitoring approaches sensitive to alterations of physicochemical properties in different porous media/rocks at various scales and the investigation of the geophysical responses of biological and geochemical processes in the subsurface. In addition, Dr. Zhang’s research group develops physics-based petrophysical and geophysical models using digital rock physics.

2017 Seminars

Azin Eftekhari Ph.D. student
Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering
Missouri S&T

3:30 p.m.
Friday May 5, 2017
Room 121 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) as an important class of indoor pollutants are of great health concern. They can be found in a variety of consumer products used indoors. They can enter the human body through ingestion, inhalation and dermal uptake. Recently, dermal uptake from clothing has been shown to be an important contributor to the body burden of some phthalate esters. The cloth-air partition coefficient, Kcloth-air, is a key parameter in estimating dermal uptake from clothing. The partition coefficient is defined at the equilibrium concentration in the fabric divided by the air concentration. Since semi-volatile organic compounds partition very slowly to fabrics, measurements of equilibrium partition coefficients can take many days or months; therefore a method that reduces the time to reach equilibrium is needed for efficient experimental work. In this research, we demonstrated that the partition coefficient, , can be measured very rapidly using the headspace analysis of vials containing cloth with a known area dosed with a known mass of the two SVOC’s considered in this study, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). The known mass of SVOCs were applied to the cloth in an appropriate volatile solvent carrier and after evaporation of solvent, the cloth was placed in a 20 ml headspace vial and allowed to equilibrate with the air in the vial. Since the volume of headspace air is small, the total mass required to transfer from cloth to air is small and also the time required is very short (a few minutes). The, partition coefficients for the two phthalate esters, DEP and DnBP, and jean (cotton) were measured at two temperatures of . We found  and  for DEP and  and  for DnBP at , respectively (). These results neatly bound values generated at 25ºC using other, more time consuming methods. This proof of concept for two phthalates suggests that the partition coefficients can be rapidly measured for many compounds, simultaneously for many fabric types.

Biography:
Azin Eftekhari is a PhD student in Dr. Glenn Morrison’s research group in the department of Environmental Engineering at Missouri University of Science & Technology. She received her bachelor’s and master’s in Chemical Engineering in Azad University of North Tehran Branch in 2007 and 2010. Her first interaction with environmental engineering happened when she started her first job in industrial waste water treatment plant and then she became familiar to air pollution researches mainly by starting her job in MATN Research Institute that they studied all environmental pollution effects of 20 power plants in Iran. She joined to Dr. Morrison’s research group on Fall 2015. She has been working on Semi Volatile Organic Compounds and their partitioning with materials present in buildings.

Craig Adams, PhD, PE, F.ASCE
Oliver L. Parks Endowed Chair & Professor
Dept. of Civil Engineering
St. Louis University

3:30 p.m.
Friday April 28, 2017
Room 121 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Controlling cyanotoxins from hazardous algal blooms (HAB) is a significant and increasing challenge for drinking water utilities in Missouri and throughout the nation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated in 2015 new health advisories for microcystins and cylindrospermopsin of 0.3 and 0.7 µg/L, respectively, for infants. Controlling these cyanotoxins as well anatoxin a and saxitoxin, can be complex due to complicating factors. For example, cyanotoxins can enter a water treatment plant in either the intracellular form (within a cyanobacteria) or extracellular form (in the water phase). Oxidation of cyanobacteria with chlorine, ozone and permanganate at the intake or anywhere prior to filtration all can cause the release of these intracellular toxins. A further complication to treatment strategies includes that certain oxidant/cyanotoxin combinations achieve rapid toxin removal for other combinations are very slow. The purpose of this talk is to present critical issues and tools (including the AWWA model Hazen-Adams CyanoTOX Ver. 2) for dealing with HABs and their associated toxins.

Biography:
Dr. Adams is the Oliver Parks Professor of Engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering at Saint Louis University. He is a Fellow of ASCE and a registered professional engineer. Dr. Adams conducts research in the Water Quality and Treatment Laboratory at SLU on the oxidation and sorption processes for drinking water contaminants (including pharmaceuticals, cyanotoxins, taste-and-odor compounds, disinfection byproducts, andother compounds). His research group uses a fundamental approach to address water quality and treatment issues to develop actionable guidance for utilities in Missouri and beyond. His group also focuses on developing point-of-use treatment technology for use in developing nations. Dr. Adams is active in AWWA and other professional organizations.

2016 Seminars

Marcus Foston, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering
Washington University, St. Louis, MO

3:30 p.m.
Friday December 2, 2016
Room 121 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Abstract:
The lignin component of biomass has potential as a renewable source for industrially useful aromatic chemicals. While technologies for the selective conversion of the carbohydrate components have been successful, lignin is generally treated as waste and burned for low grade heat. We have developed a catalytic system, based on a copper-doped porous oxide, which can reductively disassemble lignin in supercritical methanol with little to no char formation. While the copper-doped porous oxide catalyzes C-O hydrogenolysis of aryl-ether bonds linking lignin monomers, it also catalyzed ring methylation and hydrogenation, leading to lignin disassembly product proliferation. We have found that adding dimethyl carbonate can significantly suppress the hydrogenation of the phenolic intermediates responsible for much of the undesirable product diversity by methylation of phenolic hydroxyl groups to form a more stable aryl ether species. Using the methanol and dimethyl carbonate solvent system with the copper-doped porous oxide catalyst, O-methylation of phenolic hydroxyl groups was effective at increasing aromatic yields from a number of lignin model polymer systems and poplar organosolv lignin. These results demonstrate the promise of our copper-doped porous oxide catalyst when used in the presence of methanol and dimethyl carbonate to facilitate aromatic compound production from lignin.

Biography
Marcus Foston is an assistant professor in the Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering Department at Washington University in St Louis. He received his PhD in polymer chemistry in the Material Science and Engineering Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology and soon after completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His current research program is directed at the development of innovative and novel routes to exploit and utilize biomass resources. Dr. Marcus Foston primary research themes are: (1) the characterization of biomass in an effort to understand, design, and optimize its downstream conversion, (2) the development of processes that are designed to convert lignin into value-added chemicals and materials, and (3) the synthesis novel biomass-derived synthetic polymers for specific applications.

Full title: 
Toxicological Characteristics of Ambient Particulate Matter - An assessment of the relative contributions from various aerosol components and their emission sources

Vishal Verma, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

3:30 p.m.
Friday November 11, 2016
Room 121 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
A number of epidemiological, toxicological and clinical studies indicate a strong link between ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure and adverse health outcomes. Despite commendable progress in particle-related toxicological research for the last few decades, the exact mechanisms by which PM inflicts health injuries are still largely unknown. The core objective of this work is to identify the components of ambient PM and their emission sources, which are most responsible for inducing the adverse health effects in humans. The capability of the ambient particles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its linkages with their source-specific components are investigated. The role of organic compounds in the ROS activity of PM was assessed by their removal using thermodenuder and solid phase extraction technique, while the contribution of metals was quantified by chelation technique. A class of water-soluble organic compounds characterized by their strong hydrophobicity known as humic-like substances or HULIS, and transition metals particularly Fe, Cu and Mn were identified as the major species driving the ROS generation mechanism in ambient particles. Source apportionment of the ROS generation using positive matrix factorization revealed that biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol formation as the strongest sources of ROS activity in southeastern United States. Further studies in this direction should help to develop the useful insights on the origin of PM toxicity leading to a better assessment of the human health effects of ambient particulate pollution. This in turn would facilitate devising effective control strategies targeted on combating toxic PM emission sources and protecting public health.

Biography
Dr. Verma is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign and his current work is focused on measuring the toxicological properties of ambient air pollutants, investigating their emission sources and linkages with the observed health effects. Before joining here in last August, he was a research scientist at Georgia Tech. He completed his PhD from the University of Southern California in 2011. In his 8 years of research career, he has published 20 peer-reviewed articles and has presented his work in more than 25 various seminars/meetings and conferences, including several invited talks.

2015 Seminars

Dr. Dwayne A. Elias, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Assistant Professor, Biochemistry & Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee
Adjunct Associate Professor, Biological Sciences, Missouri S&T

3:30 p.m.
Friday, December 4, 2015
Room 314 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive global contaminant of concern impacting human and ecosystem health. Mercury methylation produces the neurotoxic, highly bioaccumulative methylmercury (MeHg). The genes responsible for this activity were recently identified after a >40 years search. The highly conserved nature of these genes (hgcAB) provides a foundation for broadly evaluating spatial and niche-specific patterns of microbial Hg-methylation potential in nature. Discovery and validation of the hgcAB genes has provided a starting point to further understand Hg methylation at a variety of scales, from the atomic to ecosystems and our recent work at these scales will be discussed.

Biography:
Dr. Dwayne Elias has been involved in environmental microbiology for more than 15 years with a particular focus on microbial community dynamics and metals of concern, including U, Tc, and Hg. The overall focus in the Elias laboratory is to forward efforts in bioremediation and advance preventative measures in risk management to avert contamination from occurring. Dr. Elias is regarded by the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation as an expert in microbial ecology and physiology. Dr. Elias currently leads two major efforts at ORNL for the DOE in Hg research and microbial community responses to organic and inorganic contaminants. He also is currently a contributing investigator to two efforts for the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Elias received his doctorate from the University of Oklahoma in 2002 and has since graduated 5 Ph.D. students and mentored 9 post-doctoral and 1 post-masters fellows along with several summer high school students. Since 2002, Dr. Elias has published 76 refereed articles in scientific journals, 5 patents, 7 invention disclosures, 3 book chapters and delivered 204oral and poster presentations at national and international meetings. Dr. Elias also serves as an Academic Editor at the PLoS One Journal, an Associate Editor at the Frontiers in Microbiology Journal and a scientific advisory committee member for the Department of Energy.

Sara Parker Pauley
Director

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Jefferson City, MO

2:00 p.m.
Monday, November 30, 2015
Room 125 Butler-Carlton Hall
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Missouri’s Department of Natural Resources provides research, planning, protection and enhancement of Missouri’s waters through the work of dedicated staff and partners. Director Pauley will discuss various integrated efforts the department is employing to ensure the citizens of the state and its visitors enjoy clean and abundant water for generations to come.

Biography:
Sara Parker Pauley leads the Missouri Department of Natural Resources’ efforts to protect our air, land and water; preserve our unique natural and historic places; and provide recreational and learning opportunities for everyone. Pauley began as director in December 2010 and is the second female to lead the agency. She received both her law degree and her bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri – Columbia, completed post-graduate studies in Australia as a Rotary Fellow and was an instructor for MU’s School of Natural Resources. She is also a graduate of Columbia's Hickman High School. During her career, Pauley has worked in the executive and legislative branches of state government, both fish and wildlife environmental agencies in state government, profit and nonprofit sectors and with federal, state and local governments. Under her leadership, Pauley has worked on policy development, marketing, environmental compliance, and built and improved relationships with Missouri’s communities, business and industry, the environmental community, legislators, and the public to make Missouri a leader in innovative resource conservation, while protecting our outdoor heritage for generations to come.

2014 Seminars

Kwame Awuah-Offei
Associate Professor
Mining & Nuclear Engineering Department
Missouri S&T

3:30 p.m.
Friday, February 14, 2014 
Room 314 Butler Carlton Hall- Civil Building
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
A defining feature of spatial data is autocorrelation of observations in space (i.e. observations close to each other in space are likely to be similar than those that are far apart). Spatial data can be classified by the characteristics of the d-dimensional domain into lattice, point patterns, and geostatistical data. The presence of spatial autocorrelation has specific implications for analysis, which if ignored lead to invalid inferences. The goal of this seminar is to present, and encourage discussion on: (i) the limitations of classical statistical models when applied to spatial data; and (ii) the specific answers that geostatistical analysis can provide in geo-environmental research. The presentation will use specific examples of heavy metal soil contamination and soil CO2 emissions to illustrate the value of geostatistical analysis to geo-environmental research.

Biography:
Dr. Kwame Awuah-Offei is currently an associate professor of mining engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology. He hold a PhD and BS(Hons) in mining engineering from University of Missouri-Rolla and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology, respectively. His current research interests include geostatistics, stochastic processes, and modeling, simulation, and optimization of mining systems .He has over 12 years research experience. He has industry experience in surface gold and aggregates operations. He is nationally active in the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) is the current Chair of the Sustainable Development Committee.

Dr. Santosh K. Mishra
ERC Research Chemist - Missouri S&T

3:30 PM
Friday, February 21, 2014 
Room 314 Butler Carlton Hall- Civil Building
Missouri S&T

Abstract:
Aerosols scatter solar radiation and affect climate, hence it is important to characterize changes in atmospheric aerosols due to anthropogenic sources. Trace metals in aerosols, acts as markers in identifying generic source type and are used as indicator of pollutant transport. This talk will provide an overview of analytical instrumentation for sensitive and trace level detection of organic and inorganic species in atmospheric aerosols as well as several vital pioneering contributions in developing capillary chromatography instrumentation. Pharmaceuticals, non-biodegradable emerging contaminants, often pass through elimination steps of water and wastewater treatment plants. This talk will also focus on the oxidative degradation of commonly used antibiotic and analgesic from water using novel green chemical – Ferrate. Hydrogen Cyanide is the quickest acting of all poisons. Rapid quantification of blood cyanide is very important in clinical examination and on-site forensic investigations to detect victim’s cyanide exposure and to determine the antidote to be administered in order to save human life. This talk will also shed light on invention of new miniature rapid-point-of-care miniature cyanide detector.

Biography:
Dr. Santosh Mishra is an Analytical Chemist and newly appointed Research Chemist at the Environmental Research Center at Missouri S&T. He has previously served as Technology Development Senior Process Engineer at Intel’s R&D fabrication facility in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Mishra has BS degree in Chemical Engineering from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai; MS degree in Chemistry from the Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida and PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. He holds memberships in numerous professional organizations and scientific research journals. Dr. Mishra has research interests and authored numerous papers in the areas of analytical instrumentation and analysis of atmospheric organic and inorganic contaminants.